Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Sebastopol, like many other small towns, needs to get a handle on its parking requirements. Current zoning code parking requirements is often at odds with good urbanism. Without a mechanism such as a parking assessment district, or simply reducing on-site parking requirements, our attempts at creating good pedestrian-friendly urban environments fight an uphill battle. Sebastopol has several city-owned, free surface parking lots that, like surface parking lots everywhere, leave gaping holes in the urban fabric.

Main Street Sebastopol has almost 2 whole blocks without a parking lot or auto-oriented use. (The north end of the west side of Main Street has what used to be a gas station but is now a smog check business.) These two blocks are full of traditional zero-setback buildings, mostly one story with a couple 2-story buildings sprinkled in. And while I think the buildings could be taller, these 2 blocks generally work.IMG_20150718_113337891_HDR

IMG_20150718_113245274IMG_20150717_171825281_HDR IMG_20150717_171532233 IMG_20150717_171720942_HDR IMG_20150717_171707259_HDRUnfortunately, these two blocks could not be built today. Any new building needs to provide on-site parking. Now this isn’t 100% true. Sebastopol apparently did have some kind of parking district at some point, although it’s a little vague. My understanding is that once upon a time, downtown property owner’s were allowed (required?) to buy into a parking assessment district. They paid for a certain number of spaces to be allotted in municipal parking lots for their building. If one of these lots is redeveloped they can credit the number of spaces they had ‘purchased’ toward any new parking requirement.

I would like to look at one specific example. We have a live theater company in Sebastopol, Main Stage West. The theater is in a small 2-story building on the corner of Main Street and Bodega Ave. My understanding is that the ground floor was originally a pharmacy with offices on the second floor. The offices are still on the second floor, but the ground floor has been converted to an intimate theater. It’s a great resource to have in such a small town, and does provide some after hours activity downtown. I don’t know the exact seating count, but I think it’s around 80 seats. The building takes up it’s entire lot. There is no parking on the property.

Main Stage West Theater. The theater is on the ground floor with offices above. The building takes up the entire lot.

Main Stage West Theater. The theater is on the ground floor with offices above. The building takes up the entire lot.

If someone wanted to build a theater of this size on Main Street today, they would have to provide on-site parking. The Sebastopol Zoning Code requires 1 parking space for every 4 seats in a theater. For the Main Stage West theater, this would require 20 parking spaces. for the roughly 2,200 sf second floor offices you would need 6 parking spaces (1 per 400 sf). That’s 26 parking spaces total required for this building. You couldn’t get 26 parking space on their existing site even if there was no building. The lot is 25’x87′. you actually can’t even make a parking lot with those dimensions. Assuming you could line up parking spaces in the 87′ dimension and just pull in off Bodega Ave you could get 8 parking spaces. But no room for a building, unless you built it above the parking lot. Theoretically, the building could have purchased some parking spaces when the parking assessment occurred, but I’m fairly certain they did not purchase 26 parking spaces.

We’ve essentially made the Main Street we love today impossible to build.

There is a very underutilized property at the opposite end of the block the theater is on. It had been a gas station but today is a smog check station. (Great use for Main Street, right?). The lot is about 59′ wide and 165′ deep. 9,735 sf. Say the theater wanted to move and build a slightly larger facility, assume 150 seats. That would require 38 parking spaces. If you wanted second floor offices about 24 parking spaces. Total 62  parking spaces required. I’m pretty sure that since the site had been a gas station, they never bought into the parking assessment district and would be required to supply all 62 spaces on-site. Impossible.

Smog Check property

Smog Check lot

Smog check lot

Smog check lot

Forget the theater. Make the ground floor retail with 1 floor of office above. 48 parking spaces would be required. Maybe you just make the ground floor parking and build above with a small retail space along the sidewalk to screen the parking behind. Say 800 sf of retail with 9,735 sf of office above. 26 parking spaces required. You could fit about 14 spaces on the ground floor behind the retail. That doesn’t work either. It is impossible with today’s zoning code to build a good urban building on this site.

This is not right and needs to be fixed if we have any hope of creating a good walkable people-centric downtown. Sebastopol needs a parking assessment district where downtown property owner’s are required to pay a fee that will be used to construct and maintain a municipal parking garage. And the parking garage must NOT be free. People that choose to drive and park downtown should be required to pay for the privilege and for the financing and maintenance of the parking facility. We cannot have good urbanism with the current parking requirements downtown.

Paul Fritz:

I am working with a group of people to bring Urban3 and Strong Towns to Sonoma County to study the existing development patterns and evaluate the financial productivity of different forms of land use. We hope this will help community officials make better decisions about growth by showing that sprawl is financially counterproductive to our communities. Johnny shares a great explanation here of the physical impact of pre- and post-
WWII development styles. Enjoy.

Originally posted on Granola Shotgun:

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 1.16.04 AM

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 1.18.38 AM

This week I participated in a newly formed group that will be bringing Chuck Marohn of Strong Towns and Joe Minicozzi of Urban3 to Sonoma County, California this fall. Sonoma County is experiencing the same challenges as most places across the country in terms of urban form and municipal governance and there’s a need to redefine the conversation.

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 5.16.57 PMGoogle

Santa Rosa is the seat of government for Sonoma County. I’m going to highlight two different parts of town and two very different forms of urbanism to demonstrate the basic message behind both Strong Towns and Urban3.

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 1.33.08 AM

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 3.26.23 PM

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 3.29.00 PM

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 3.25.54 PM

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 3.38.02 PM

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 3.40.10 PM

Screen Shot 2015-06-12 at 3.27.52 PM

This is the historic downtown of Santa Rosa. It’s compact, walkable, bikeable, and has good quality public parks. Most buildings in downtown are two stories tall, although there are many one story buildings and a few buildings that are five or six stories. This is a textbook example of a traditional pre World War…

View original 1,312 more words

Just wanted to send out a quick link to a recent blog post on Strong Towns about small towns and urbanism which is obviously the focus of this blog. We don’t often think of small towns as being urban. But good small towns are urban places, albeit on a different scale from some place like New York City. And we can take lessons from big places and scale them down and apply them in small towns. The result is places that are oriented toward people. Enjoy.

Small Scale Lessons for New York City Skeptics

I walk. A lot. I try to walk or bike when I need to get around town as much as possible. Which generally works well. I’m fortunate in that I live 2 blocks from my office and within walking or biking distance of most of my daily needs. Occasionally I need to drive to an out of town meeting, but I often do not drive at all during the week.

Sebastopol has been making improvements to the pedestrian infrastructure, but generally, our streets are still dominated by cars and pedestrians need to remain vigilant. The most significant thing the city has been doing is installing improved crosswalks. These have signs, stamped colored asphalt paving and flashing lights (some crosswalks have them embedded in the paving in addition to pole-mounted lights) that are triggered by pedestrians pushing a button prior to crossing. Not every car stops when the lights are flashing, but eventually they do and it makes drivers more aware of pedestrians.

Street Smart Sebastopol crossing of Main Street and Calder

Street Smart Sebastopol crossing of Main Street and Calder

However, as pedestrians, we cannot assume that we are always seen by drivers and must take responsibility for our own safety. Cars are big and potentially dangerous to pedestrians, and pedestrians need to remain alert to that fact. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration more than 4,700 pedestrians were killed in traffic accidents in 2012 and over 76,000 were injured. I often see pedestrians engaging in activities that could put themselves into danger. Most often it is texting or talking on their phone or listening to music. While it may not be as dangerous as doing so while driving it does take your attention away from what you are doing. This is particularly dangerous when you find yourself in a space you have to share with a car like crossing a street or driveway. Drivers do not always see you and it is your responsibility to make sure they do.

While the newer, improved crosswalks are helpful, I never walk into the crosswalk until I am positive that the car is stopping, and then I proceed slowly until I know that the car in the second lane is stopping as well. It is amazing how often a car in the lane closest to me stops and several cars blow by in the next lane, as if the first car is stopping for no reason. And they are more effective when activated. I see many people just walk into the crosswalk without pushing the button to  turn on the flashing lights. I know it’s one more thing to do, but it’s worth the effort.

Pedestrians also must never assume that just because you have a walk signal at a crosswalk, or a green light that it is safe to cross. You still need to watch for cars making right hand turns and cars running a red light. Drivers are not always looking for you, so you must be aware of them.

One-way streets create a difficult situation for pedestrians crossing intersecting side streets. And because Main Street and Petaluma Avenue are one-way we have quite a few of these locations in Sebastopol. Drivers on the side streets that are turning onto the one-way street tend only to look for vehicular traffic coming from the single direction. If you are a pedestrian coming from the opposite direction it is likely they will not look in your direction. You need to make sure they are aware of you before you enter the street.

I will say that I think being a regular walker has made me a better driver. Since I’m so often a pedestrian I find myself more aware of pedestrians and bikes when I’m driving. If we design our communities to encourage more walking we may end up with better drivers. Much of the emphasis on decreasing traffic accidents focuses on drivers, and they do have a big responsibility as cars can be deadly and we need to always be aware of that fact as drivers. However, traffic safety is a shared responsibility and pedestrians must remain vigilant and accountable for their own safety.

I was asked recently to suggest ways to provide vitality in a small town downtown in the evening, after the shops close. It’s a great question and one in which many small towns struggle with. People are out and about downtown during the day and on weekends in particular, but after the shops close at 6:00 things get pretty quiet. Most of the businesses in downtown Sebastopol are retail in nature. We have a decent number and variety of restaurants downtown, particularly for a town its size. But these alone are not enough to create a vibrant downtown scene in the evening. A downtown needs entertainment and social venues to keep it active. It also benefits greatly from people living nearby.

I think one place that helps keep Sebastopol even a little vibrant in the evenings is the movie theater. The movie theater is located in a building that was formerly a distillery (I don’t know when the conversion was made, but it’s probably been at least 20 years). It’s a great re-use of an existing building located in the heart of downtown Sebastopol. It currently operates as the Rialto Cinema which relocated from Santa Rosa about 3 years ago. It shows a combination of independent, foreign, documentary and mainstream films. They also broadcast Metropolitan Opera and London’s National Theatre Live events and screen other special events including a live screening party for the Oscars and the Sebastopol Documentary Film Festival. It’s a great resource for a small community and a great fit for Sebastopol.

The problem with the theater is the way the physical building fits into the community. I realize they were working with an existing building, and maybe I don’t understand all of the limitations. But physically, it turns it’s back to the town. The aerial photo shows the location of the theater in relation to downtown. Sebastopol downtown aerial with barlow-042013As you can see, it is kitty-corner from the town plaza. Almost all of the residential neighborhoods in Sebastopol are located to the west (left) in the aerial photo. So people approaching the theater will be coming from the direction of the plaza.

View of Rialto Cinema from the plaza

View of Rialto Cinema from the plaza. The logo at the top of the sign announces ‘Rialto Cinema’ but that’s all that identifies this building as a movie theater.

The small park on the corner, which is city-owned property, has a sidewalk that connects visually with the plaza, if you know what you are looking for.

Sidewalk that points  to the plaza across the street.

Sidewalk that points to the plaza behind me across the street.

And it does lead you to the lobby. But the actual entry to the theater is on the opposite side of the building, facing the parking lot.

Entry to lobby, across the parking lot.

Entry to lobby, across the parking lot.

Once again, we expect, encourage, and reward people who drive while making pedestrians search for the entry to the building.

The theater lobby is currently being remodeled, but the entry will still not at all be obvious on approach to the building. To be honest, I lived in Sebastopol at least 3, and maybe as long as 6 months, before I even knew where the movie theater was. I would hear people talk about the movie theater but for the life of me couldn’t figure out where it was. Look at the location of, I guess you would call it a marquee? You really cannot see it unless you are across the street from it. This is not a location many people would find themselves.

Cannot see this 'marquee' from just about anywhere.

Cannot see this ‘marquee’ from just about anywhere.

An entrance on the west side would make this building feel much more a part of the community. People leaving the theater after a film would be directed toward Main Street to maybe grab a bite to eat or have a drink. As it is now, you are sent back to your car and on your way back home. Or if you go out to dinner after, you are encouraged to get in your car and drive. Doesn’t bode well to encourage you to park once and walk when downtown.

The theater also now serves as a critical link between The Barlow and Main Street. On that score it is particularly not successful. This is the frontage on McKinley Street which leads to The Barlow behind me.IMG_20150410_110025068 While The Barlow and Main Street are about a 3 minute walk apart, this wall and the largely vacant site across the street make it feel much farther. To be fair, this is a new arrangement. When the building was converted to a theater, the area which is now known as The Barlow was warehouses and light industry and there was no reason to walk down McKinley Street which was a dead end. But thinking of how this frontage could be at least a bit more interesting is crucial to linking Main Street and The Barlow, along with the redevelopment of the property on the opposite side of the street, which doesn’t even have a sidewalk.

It would also be great if the theater could do something to announce it’s presence. I realize it’s too late to relocate the lobby to the west end of the building. But new signage, including a real marquee that reaches toward the plaza, would be great to let people who are just visiting, or even new arrivals to Sebastopol, that we have a great movie theater in town. I don’t know that it would increase the vitality of downtown, but it certainly wouldn’t hurt.

Here is an interesting editorial from the local newspaper about housing and the cost of sprawl.

Golis: Can we change how we think about | The Press Democrat.

Paul Fritz:

Here is a good article that discusses the affordability of secondary dwelling units as a follow up to my post.

Originally posted on Accessory Dwellings:

This might be the “deepest” post in my whole series about research and policy on accessory dwelling units.   Though ADUs and affordable housing are often mentioned in the same breath, a closer look at this pairing seems to demonstrate a weakness, not in one policy position or another, but in the whole discussion about affordable housing itself.   It takes some work to see how ADUs even fit.

Ultimately, I feel the evidence shows ADUs have tremendous potential for creating  reasonably priced housing.  Studies in two cities indicate that, without any regulation or subsidy, 15-20% of ADUs are occupied for rents that are zero or far below market rates.  But governments and activists need to take time to understand how this form of development is unique.   In particular, it is a mistake to assume that the homeowners who create ADUs have the same skills and goals as professional developers.

But…

View original 2,090 more words

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 38 other followers

%d bloggers like this: